2011'10.17.Mon

FREE MAKEUP NO PARTICIPATION : NO PARTICIPATION


Free makeup no participation : Eye makeup books.



Free Makeup No Participation





free makeup no participation






    participation
  • The action of taking part in something

  • (participate) share in something

  • engagement: the act of sharing in the activities of a group; "the teacher tried to increase his students' engagement in class activities"

  • the condition of sharing in common with others (as fellows or partners etc.)





    makeup
  • Cosmetics such as lipstick or powder applied to the face, used to enhance or alter the appearance

  • The composition or constitution of something

  • The combination of qualities that form a person's temperament

  • an event that is substituted for a previously cancelled event; "he missed the test and had to take a makeup"; "the two teams played a makeup one week later"

  • cosmetics applied to the face to improve or change your appearance

  • constitution: the way in which someone or something is composed





    free
  • able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint; "free enterprise"; "a free port"; "a free country"; "I have an hour free"; "free will"; "free of racism"; "feel free to stay as long as you wish"; "a free choice"

  • Without cost or payment

  • With the sheets eased

  • loose: without restraint; "cows in India are running loose"

  • grant freedom to; free from confinement











free makeup no participation - Heavenly Participation:




Heavenly Participation: The Weaving of a Sacramental Tapestry


Heavenly Participation: The Weaving of a Sacramental Tapestry



Surveying the barriers that contemporary thinking has erected between the natural and the supernatural, between earth and heaven, Hans Boersma issues a wake-up call for Western Christianity. Both Catholics and evangelicals, he says, have moved too far away from a sacramental mindset, focusing more on the “here-and-now” than on the “then-and-there.” Yet, as Boersma points out, the teaching of Jesus, Paul, and St. Augustine — indeed, of most of Scripture and the church fathers — is profoundly otherworldly, much more concerned with heavenly participation than with earthly enjoyment.
In Heavenly Participation Boersma draws on the wisdom of great Christian minds ancient and modern — Irenaeus, Gregory of Nyssa, C. S. Lewis, Henri de Lubac, John Milbank, and many others. He urges Catholics and evangelicals alike to retrieve a sacramental worldview, to cultivate a greater awareness of eternal mysteries, to partake eagerly of the divine life that transcends and transforms all earthly realities.

“Hans Boersma makes a superb contribution to evangelical theological reflection in this well-designed book, and it goes a long way to drawing us back from the brink of a fashionable evangelical tendency to reductive historicism. His re-situation of the doctrine of the Incarnation in its historic sacramental language and thought opens up the way to a deeper understanding of the truths of faith that evangelicals and Catholics alike seek to comprehend and nurture.”
— David Lyle Jeffrey
Baylor University

“Theology at its best, says Hans Boersma, is less interested in comprehending the truth than in participating in it. Skillfully marshalling passages from the church fathers and medieval theologians and drawing judiciously on contemporary evangelical and Catholic thinkers, Boersma shows that theology is not primarily an intellectual enterprise but a spiritual discipline by which one enters into the truth and is mastered by it. Though this ‘sacramental tapestry,’ as he calls it, is as old as the church, it is refreshing to have it presented anew in this engaging book.”
— Robert Louis Wilken
University of Virginia

Surveying the barriers that contemporary thinking has erected between the natural and the supernatural, between earth and heaven, Hans Boersma issues a wake-up call for Western Christianity. Both Catholics and evangelicals, he says, have moved too far away from a sacramental mindset, focusing more on the “here-and-now” than on the “then-and-there.” Yet, as Boersma points out, the teaching of Jesus, Paul, and St. Augustine — indeed, of most of Scripture and the church fathers — is profoundly otherworldly, much more concerned with heavenly participation than with earthly enjoyment.
In Heavenly Participation Boersma draws on the wisdom of great Christian minds ancient and modern — Irenaeus, Gregory of Nyssa, C. S. Lewis, Henri de Lubac, John Milbank, and many others. He urges Catholics and evangelicals alike to retrieve a sacramental worldview, to cultivate a greater awareness of eternal mysteries, to partake eagerly of the divine life that transcends and transforms all earthly realities.

“Hans Boersma makes a superb contribution to evangelical theological reflection in this well-designed book, and it goes a long way to drawing us back from the brink of a fashionable evangelical tendency to reductive historicism. His re-situation of the doctrine of the Incarnation in its historic sacramental language and thought opens up the way to a deeper understanding of the truths of faith that evangelicals and Catholics alike seek to comprehend and nurture.”
— David Lyle Jeffrey
Baylor University

“Theology at its best, says Hans Boersma, is less interested in comprehending the truth than in participating in it. Skillfully marshalling passages from the church fathers and medieval theologians and drawing judiciously on contemporary evangelical and Catholic thinkers, Boersma shows that theology is not primarily an intellectual enterprise but a spiritual discipline by which one enters into the truth and is mastered by it. Though this ‘sacramental tapestry,’ as he calls it, is as old as the church, it is refreshing to have it presented anew in this engaging book.”
— Robert Louis Wilken
University of Virginia










88% (9)





Alvin Theater (now Neil Simon Theater)




Alvin Theater (now Neil Simon Theater)





Theater District, Midtown Manhattan

The Alvin Theater survives today as one of the historic theaters that symbolize American theater for both New York and the nation. Built in 1926-27, the Alvin was one of the relatively small number of post-World War I theaters built not by the Shubert or Chanin organizations, but rather for a special client. The Alvin was designed by prolific theater architect Herbert J. Krapp to house the productions and the offices of producers Alex Aarons and Vinton Freed ley, from whose abbreviated first names the acronym "Alvin" was created.

Herbert J. Krapp was the most prolific architect of the Broadway theater district. Having worked in the offices of Herts & Tallant, premier theater designers of the pre-war period, Krapp went on to design theaters for the two major builders of the post-war era, the Shubert and Chanin organizations. He was occasionally retained by independent theater builders, however, as in the case of the Alvin. For the Alvin he designed an exceptionally handsome neo-Georgian facade with Adamesque detailing. Its asymmetrical but balanced massing clearly expresses its division into auditorium and stage section.

The Alvin was built to showcase the musical comedies of Aarons and Freed ley, and has had a consistently outstanding history of Iong-running shows, beginning with Funny Face, featuring the young Fred Astaire. For half a century the Alvin Theater has served as hone to countless numbers of the plays through which the Broadway theater has come to personify American theater. As such, it continues to help define the Broadway theater district, the largest and most famous concentration of legitimate stage theaters in the world.

The development of the Broadway Theater District

The area of midtown Manhattan known today as the Broadway theater district encompasses the largest concentration of legitimate playhouses in the world. The theaters located there, some dating from the turn of the century, are significant for their contributions to the history of the New York stage, for their influence upon American theater as a whole, and in many cases for their architectural design.

The development of the area around Times Square as New York's theater district at the end of the 19th century occurred as a result of two related factors: the northward movement of the population of Manhattan Island (abetted by the growth of several forms of mass transportation), and the expansion of New York's role in American theater. The northward movement of Manhattan's residential, commercial, and entertainment districts had been occurring at a steady rate throughout the 19th century. In the early 1800s, businesses, stores, hotels, and places of amusement had clustered together in the vicinity of lower Broadway.

As New York's various businesses moved north, they began to isolate themselves in mare or less separate areas: the financial institutions remained downtown? the major retail stores situated themselves on Broadway between 14th and 23rd Streets, eventually moving to Herald Square and Fifth Avenue at the turn of the century; the hotels, originally located near the stores and theaters, began to cong egate around major transportation centers such as Grand Central Terminal or on the newly fashionable Fifth Avenue; while the mansions of the wealthy spread farther north on Fifth Avenue, as did such objects of their beneficence as the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The theater district, which had existed in the midst of stores, hotels, and other businesses along lower Broadway for most of the 19th century* spread northward in stages, stopping for a time at Union Square, then Madison Square, then Herald Square. By the last two decades of the 19th century, far-sighted theater managers had begun to extend the theater district even farther north along Broadway, until they had reached the area that was then known as Long Acre Square and is today called Times Square.

A district of farmlands and rural summer homes in the early 1800s, Long Acre Square had by the turn of the century evolved into a hub of mass transportation. A horsecar line had run across 42nd Street as early as the 1860s, and in 1871, with the opening of Grand Central Depot and the completion of the Third and Sixth Avenue Elevated Railways, it was comparatively simple for both New Yorkers and out-of-towners to reach Long Acre Square. Transportation continued to play a large part in the development of the area; in 1904 New York's subway system was inaugurated, with a major station located at 42nd Street and Broadway. The area was then renamed Times Square in honor of the newly erected Times Building. The evolution of the Times Square area as a center of Manhattan's various mass transit systems made it a natural choice for the location of legitimate playhouses, which needed to be easily accessible to their audiences.

The theater business that invaded Long Acre Square at the end of the 19th century consisted of fa











Mr Missa




Mr Missa





February 28, 2006 - New Orleans, LA. French Quarter. Mardi Gras. Roger and Missa.

Remember that uninsured, unregistered, untitled, and no speedometered Jeep in which I came to New Orleans? Missa is one of the two friends with whom I came to New Orleans from the San Francisco Bay Area. The killer hat and suit you see her wearing she got in a free bin at Momma D's.









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